Target Health Blog

History of Medicine

Calcium

September 17, 2018

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History of Medicine

CRISPR

February 19, 2018

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History of Medicine

Dr. Peter Dennis Mitchell, British Biochemist

October 30, 2017

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History of Medicine

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1978 was awarded to Peter Mitchell “for his contribution to the understanding of biological energy transfer through the formulation of the chemiosmotic theory“.

Diabetes

September 18, 2017

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History of Medicine

Medicine and the Philosophy of Rene Descartes; Cogito ergo sum

June 12, 2017

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History of Medicine

The French philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes (1596-1650) gave a high priority to medicine and dedicated a great deal of his life to medical studies. Nevertheless, his relation to medicine has always been debated. A number of recent works have contributed to reassessing the earlier critique which nearly wrote him out from medical history. The recent biographical dismissal of a number of earlier allegations and the recent interpretations of the medical contents of his collected writings ought to result in Descartes' reinstatement in medical history.

Jan Evangelista Purkyne, Medical Researcher, Cell Biologist (1787-1869)

May 15, 2017

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History of Medicine

Jan Evangelista Purkyne (Czech: also written Johann Evangelist Purkinje) (1787-1869) was a Czech anatomist and physiologist. He was one of the best known scientists of his time. In 1839, he coined the term ?protoplasm' for the fluid substance of a cell. His son was the painter Karel Purkyne. Such was his fame that when people from outside Europe wrote letters to him, all that they needed to put as the address was "Purkyne, Europe". He is buried in the Czech National Cemetery in Vysehrad, Prague, modern-day Czech Republic.

Benjamin Franklin's Contributions to Health and Medicine

Benjamin Franklin took a great interest in health-related topics. In his day, many beliefs about health and disease were based on superstition. Franklin applied Enlightenment reasoning to his study of various afflictions and came up with some astonishingly accurate hypotheses. Here are just a few of Franklin's theories and accomplishments in the fields of health, physical fitness, and medicine.

History of Cell Biology 101

Editor's note: The evolution of the cell is one of Science's most awesome areas of study, leading to the origins of life itself. It is beyond our comprehension, why anyone able to contribute to the funding of research, inquiring into the mystery of life, and its pathologies, which cell biology does, why anyone would not be eager to do so. Perhaps Americans should vote to require that all politicians have an education high enough to enable them to understand the worlds of science, math, technology, engineering, and all the arts (which remind us of our humanity).

Arvid Carlsson MD (1923 to Present) and Still Going Strong at 94!

April 17, 2017

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History of Medicine

Editor's note: Short background Kathleen Montagu (died 28 March 1966) was the first researcher to identify dopamine in human brains. Working in Hans Weil-Malherbe's laboratory at the Runwell Hospital outside London, the presence of dopamine was identified by paper chromatography in the brain of several species, including a human brain. Her research was published in August 1957, followed and confirmed by Hans Weil-Malherbe in November 1957. Nobel Prize-rewarded Arvid Carlsson to be the first researcher to identify that dopamine is a neurotransmitter. His research was published in November 1957, along with colleagues Margit Linsqvist and Tor Magnusson.

Gerontology

April 3, 2017

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History of Medicine

Gerontology, from the Greek, geron, “old man” and -logia, “study of”; coined by Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov (in 1903) is the study of the social, cultural, psychological, cognitive, and biological aspects of aging. It is distinguished from geriatrics, which is the branch of medicine that specializes in the treatment of existing disease in older adults. Gerontologists include researchers and practitioners in the fields of biology, nursing, medicine, criminology, dentistry, social work, physical and occupational therapy, psychology, psychiatry, sociology, economics, political science, architecture, geography, pharmacy, public health, housing, and anthropology.

Stephen L. Hauser MD (1949 to Present)

April 3, 2017

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History of Medicine

Stephen L. Hauser is the Robert A. Fishman Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where his work has focused on immune mechanisms and multiple sclerosis (MS). Hauser is a principal investigator of a large multinational effort to identify genetic effects on MS, and part of the team that identified that humoral immune mechanisms are important in the pathogenesis of MS lesions, leading to the development of B-cell based therapies for MS. He has contributed to the establishment of nationwide and international genetics consortia that have identified more than 50 gene variants that contribute to MS risk.

Kfar Shaul Mental Health Center in Jerusalem

March 20, 2017

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History of Medicine

Kfar Shaul Mental Health Center, established in 1951, is an Israeli public psychiatric hospital located between Givat Shaul and Har Nof, Jerusalem. It is affiliated with the Hadassah Medical Center and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The hospital is Jerusalem's designated psychiatric hospital for tourists who display mental health disturbances, and is widely known for its research on Jerusalem Syndrome.

Stephan Wolfram (1959 to Present)

March 13, 2017

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History of Medicine

Target Health Inc. is an eCRO, that creates software for clinical trials and is interested in how Big Data is sorted through, especially for application to medical research, and clinical trials.

History of Cupping as a Medical Device

March 6, 2017

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History of Medicine

According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), cupping is a method of creating a vacuum on the patient’s skin to dispel stagnation (stagnant blood and lymph), thereby improving qi flow, in order to treat respiratory diseases such as the common cold, pneumonia and bronchitis. Cupping also is used on back, neck, shoulder and other musculoskeletal conditions.

Rebecca Davis Lee Crumpler MD, First African American Female Physician

February 13, 2017

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History of Medicine

Rebecca Davis Lee Crumpler, nee Davis, (February 8, 1831 – March 9, 1895) was the first African-American woman to become a physician in the United States. She married Arthur Crumpler who had served with the Union Army during the American Civil War.

William Bradley Coley MD – Pioneer of Immunotherapy

February 6, 2017

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History of Medicine

William Bradley Coley (1862 – 1936) was an American bone surgeon and cancer researcher and the pioneer of cancer immunotherapy. He developed a treatment based on provoking an immune response to bacteria. In 1968 a protein related to his work was identified and called tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

Thrilling Rescue Revealed, of U.S. Medics & Nurses, During WW 2 in Albania

January 30, 2017

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History of Medicine

Harold Hayes was a member of a band of airborne American medics and nurses who crash-landed in Nazi-occupied Albania in 1943 and trekked 600 miles to their rescue. All of these brave heroes were military trained army lieutenants. Harold Hayes, was the last surviving member of a band of airborne American medics and nurses who crashed-landed in Nazi-occupied Albania in 1943 and survived German attacks, blizzards and horrific privations on a 600-mile trek to their rescue on the Adriatic coast. He died last Sunday in Medford, Ore. He was 94. His death, at a hospital, followed an operation to remove a blood clot from his leg, his daughter Margaret Bleakley said.

Ancient Methods of Birth Control

January 23, 2017

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History of Medicine

The Egyptian Ebers Papyrus from 1550 BCE and the Kahun Papyrus from 1850 BCE have within them some of the earliest documented descriptions of birth control: the use of honey, acacia leaves and lint to be placed in the vagina to block sperm.

100 Years Later, Death Theories of Healer, Grigori Rasputin Remain a Mystery

January 16, 2017

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History of Medicine

Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin was a Russian peasant, an experienced traveler, a mystical faith healer, and trusted friend of the family of Nicholas II, the last Tsar of the Russian Empire. He became an influential figure in Saint Petersburg, especially after August 1915 when Nicholas took command of the army fighting in World War I.

Homosexuality

January 9, 2017

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History of Medicine

The earliest Western documents (in the form of literary works, art objects, and mythographic materials) concerning same-gender relationships are derived from ancient Greece.

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